Frequently Asked Questions

If you're wondering, chances are someone else has asked the same question.

KBF Membership

Click each question to reveal the answer.

When does my 2016 KBF Membership expire?

Regardless of when you paid your 2016 KBF Membership dues, it expires on December 31, 2016. It is a “2016” membership, after all. In December we’ll send out emails or text messages to all 2016 KBF Members who have not yet re-upped for 2017 to invite them to renew.

I paid my 2017 KBF Membership dues in August 2016. Am I a member now?

Yes. We launched our 2017 KBF Membership Recruitment Drive on August 10, 2016. As of that day the only membership one may select in the KBF Online Store is a 2017 KBF Membership (with or without KBF BONUS BUCKS). Anyone who pays his 2017 dues in August is immediately eligible for all KBF Member-only events and all KBF Member benefits; they are not delayed until 1/1/ 2017. A couple dozen people joined KBF between August 1 and August 10, before the 2017 Membership drive started. We emailed each of them a personal invitation to upgrade to a 2017 membership and a discount code that made the upgrade free. Bottom line…all who select and pay for a 2017 KBF Membership is a member for the rest of 2016 and all 2017.

Is there a KBF Lifetime Membership

Yes, there is. While most members opt to renew their membership annually by paying their dues year after year, others make a long-term commitment to helping KBF grow, join KBF, and avoid the yearly enrollment process.

Annual membership dues are $50 (at this time; subject to price increases over time). A KBF Lifetime Membership costs $500. As an introductory offer, KBF discounted the Lifetime option 30% in the first three months, making it $350 through December 31, 2016. [Join/Upgrade Now]

What is the difference between Membership and BONUS BUCKS?

Basically, Membership enables you to participate in Member-only activities and save money. BONUS BUCKS is an optional incentive awards program that provides cash and product bonuses. One may become a KBF Member by paying the annual dues, which are $50 at this time. This will qualify you to enter KBF Member-only competitions and for special Member-only discount programs, special offers, and perks. KBF Members may enroll in the KBF BONUS BUCKS Program ($100 separately, or save $10 by enrolling when paying KBF Membership dues), which makes them eligible for bonuses for a wide variety of reasons, like use of sponsors’ products, representing KBF, participating and performing well in competition, and participating in contests and activities.

I’m a KBF Member. Does that mean I’m automatically in KBF BONUS BUCKS, too?

No. KBF Membership and KBF BONUS BUCKS Program are separate programs KBF Membership is a prerequisite for participation in KBF BONUS BUCKS. KBF BONUS BUCKS participation is not mandatory for KBF Members.

What does it cost a KBF Member to enroll in the KBF BONUS BUCKS Program?

The fee to enroll in the KBF BONUS BUCKS Program is $100 [Enroll now]. Starting in 2017, KBF BONUS BUCKS is restricted to KBF Members. When one pays for Membership and BONUS BUCKS as a combo, we knock off $10, making the price $140 [Join KBF]

Is there a lifetime BONUS BUCKS registration?

No, BONUS BUCKS registrations run year-to-year, and there’s no lifetime option.

The KBF BONUS BUCKS contingency rewards program is something we came up with to induce kayak anglers to get involved with our Challenges and Tournaments. KBF Members who want to participate throw in a hundred bucks a year, and they hope to win their money back and more in the same year. Some don’t win any. Others win some. A few win a lot.

In the first year, KBF paid out more than three times the amount collected in registration fees. We supplemented the bonus pool from operating capital and sponsor donations. Bonus pool funds are managed so that what KBF is able to pay out bonuses in proportion to what we take in. We believe it’s helped to inject some excitement and created opportunities for rewards.

It’s not as if KBF were looking for a way to get rid of some extra money and came up with BONUS BUCKS. This is a marketing initiative, and like any marketing program, we will review it periodically and either extend or discontinue it. Will this particular program endure? Maybe, maybe not. We plan to run it again in 2017. If, at some point in the future, we come up with an even more effective marketing program, we’d most likely discontinue KBF BONUS BUCKS and switch to it. Since we’re not guaranteeing that BONUS BUCKS will always be a part of KBF, then it would not be ethical for us to offer a lifetime participation fee. Even if we run it another five or ten years, trying to manage the funds so that we don’t run through them in the first year but disburse them over a long span of time would be a pretty big bite…more than we care to chew right now.

Can I give a KBF Membership as a gift?

 

Yes, you may purchase a KBF Membership, setting up a KBF Online Store Account in the gift recipient’s name, or you may purchase a KBF Gift Card (actually a gift code), which that person may use to pay for KBF Membership (with or without a BONUS BUCKS Program enrollment). If you purchase the membership as a gift for another person, please email us at accounting@kayakbassfishing.com so we can make sure our records accurately show your gift recipient as the KBF Member.

Does KBF have a Membership level or program for students?

KBF Partners include high school and college fishing clubs and teams. Student membership fees are half-price, but they enjoy the same benefits as adult KBF Members. Check the KBF Young Guns web page for more details on youth programs.

Is there a KBF Military Discount?

Yes, there is. We appreciate the sacrifices being made by active duty military personnel and those who have served in the past. To qualify one must:

  1. Be on active duty status with the US Military, or
  2. Have retired after a career in the US military, and
  3. Email a digital photo of your military ID to accounting@kayakbassfishing.com.

We will then email a 10% discount code that will knock $5 off KBF Membership Dues.

The military discount does not extend to family members (spouse, siblings, parents, children) or extended family.

How do I change contact information for my KBF Membership?

First log into the KBF Online Store with your email address and password. The next webpage you see will be your account summary, including your address. At the bottom is a link to “Change My Address.” (If you did not create an account when you became a KBF Member, then click “Create an Account” at the top of any store page. There you can change your address, email address, name, and phone number. If you encounter any problems, e-mail kbfjoe@gmail.com with your changes. Please include your first and last name.

Does KBF conduct tournaments outside the United States?

No, not at this time. All KBF Challenges and Tournaments are held in the United States.

How do I save money with KBF Member Discounts?

 

KBF Members are given a password that they use to enter the KBF Members Only Web page. There you’ll find listed current providers, discount codes, and each vendor’s requirement and restrictions. If you don’t remember the password to open the Members Only page, email accounting@kayakbassfishing.com, providing your full name, and we will send that password to the email on the Member’s KBF Online Store Account.

KBF Tournaments FAQ

What's the difference between a Challenge and Tournament?

Both are competitive events. “Tournament” is the term KBF uses for meet-up competitive events. “Challenge” is what we call virtual or online competition, where anglers don’t assemble.

What water is in-bounds or eligible for KBF competition?

KBF permits competition only on publicly accessible waters, which we refer to in the Rules as “Eligible Waters.” To be eligible, the body of water must, first, be inside the competition area boundary set by the event. Competitors may not cross private or restricted property to reach it. It cannot be posted continuously or during competition hours as “Off-Limits” or “No Fishing” by state or federal agencies. In other words, the water must be accessible to the public, and be where fishing is permitted by regulations and by the controlling authority (state, county, municipality, business, private ownership, residential area association or property management). A competitor must be able to access the water from or across publicly-accessible areas or right-of-ways. If a community pond is posted and reserved for residents only so that unauthorized use would be trespassing, even if one is not physically prevented from driving up to a ramp and launching, that water is ineligible. Permission from a home-owner to use private lakes or ponds or cross private property does not make that water eligible. However, if a community or homeowner’s association lake provides public access and one can launch on it from unrestricted shoreline, even though it’s otherwise surrounded by private property, it’s eligible. If a pay-to-fish lake does not discriminate so that any member of the public may pay the user fee to fish it, that’s a public-access water and is eligible. Finally, if a lake has posted use times, it is eligible only during the hours permitted by the owner or the regulatory body.

Why does KBF use the Hawg Trough as its measuring device?

Several years back, kayak anglers and kayak fishing clubs were using dozens of different measuring devices. KBF began conducting online or “virtual” tournaments and addressed the need for standardization. At that time, KBF management evaluated all the measuring boards on the market, including the good, ol’ trusty Golden Rule, beloved by bass boat fishermen. KBF wanted a very durable, accurate, tamper-proof, floating board with quarter-inch increments that showed up clearly in photographs, curved to hold fish more securely, and that was a fair value in terms of price. Nothing like that existed at the time, so KBF selected the one that came closest — the Hawg Trough. Was it perfect? Obviously not, but it was the best alternative commercially available then. That’s about to change.

Since then thousands of kayak anglers have bought Hawg Troughs, which has enabled us to be consistent, fair, and objective in judging events. Even when better solutions become available and are approved by KBF, Hawg Troughs will still be acceptable in KBF competition for a specific transition period.

KBF has never been involved in Hawg Trough manufacture nor do we receive any financial consideration from their sales, either from the manufacturer or from retailers. We, too, are keenly aware of the deficiencies of the current product and approached several manufacturers over the years with suggestions and requests that they produce improved measuring devices. Two of America’s top kayak gear manufacturers have stepped up and are in the final stages of development of radically improved measuring boards. We expect them to be out in the next few months. From what we’ve seen so far, they will be much better than anything available on the market today.

KBF does not require Hawg Trough lines to be inked, though we encourage the practice. Competitors are free to ink them or not…to paint them in camo or weird, psychedelic patterns if they prefer. Some smear ink or paint across the boards and scrape off the ridges so they stand out clearly. That’s fine, too. No matter whether a board is inked or not, or how sloppy it is, KBF judges do our best to evaluate each photo so scoring on every single fish is accurate and consistent with our rules and standards. We enlarge photos 500% or bigger in our browser views, export them to Photoshop to enhance visibility, contact competitors and request alternative photos of the same fish, and/or ask other judges to offer a second opinion. We do all that to be fair to you. Well, not to all of you, because as far as I can tell, some of our most vocal critics in this topic have never competed in a KBF event and are not on any KBF Partner roster that has been provided to us. But we go to extremes to be fair to kayak anglers who are actually competing in KBF Tournaments and Challenges. Some might call that nit-picking. If so, they’re right. We nit-pick to make sure that every competitor gets the maximum score for each fish he submits.

From time to time KBF will advise anglers on best practices because we’re committed to conducting professional, fair competitive events and to helping the anglers who participate in them maximize their scores.

How can a Hawg Trough be modified?

KBF recommends that competitors ink the raised measurement “ribs” of their Hawg Troughs by laying a permanent felt-tip ink pen over on its side and stroking the top of each rib.

ribs-inkedMake every effort to get ink only on the top of each rib and not off to one side or the other. Hawg Troughs with quarter-inch marks where ink is also on the board–not just on the ribs–slow down KBF judges (and sometimes cost competitors a quarter inch in length). Judges have seen them inked off to the left of the measurement ribs, to the right, and sometimes fat ink lines spill over both sides. In this photo, for example, thick inked lines are to the left of the ribs. Although the caudal fin tip touches the inked line, making it appear to be 17.75″, enhancing the photo (as represented in the lower image) shows that the fin falls short of the ribbed line, so KBF judges would score this fish as 17.50″.
Laying your Sharpie over at a flat angle and running the side of the felt tip along the top of the rib, as shown in “B,” deposits a line of ink along the top of each rib. A steeper angle (as in “A”) makes following the top of the rib more difficult. At any rate, if you want to help KBF do a more accurate job of judging, please ink just the top of each rib and not off to one side or the other.

What does KBF do when an identifier in a photo is damaged, partially covered, or the lighting makes it hard to read?

Rule 10.A. states, in part: “A. Legible. Photo must be positioned in the photo and clear enough to read identifier, including required ID codes and marks….”

Whether bass photos in KBF Challenges should be accepted or disqualified based on the readability or legibility of an identifier is an important question. We see photos in almost every event where we have to exert extra effort to validate an ID that is not completely legible. We want all our members to fully understand our rules and rationales.

We enter into a contract with each angler who registers to compete in KBF competition. KBF agrees to conduct a fair, impartial, professional event and make judgement calls in accordance with the rules, without bias or favoritism. The competitor agrees to comply with the rules and abide by the terms and conditions of competition.

To that end, the judges in KBF events bend over backwards to evaluate each fish submitted to us on its merits, within the rules, and disqualify photos only as a last resort. When possible, we impose progressive penalties for some infractions, like a bass’s mouth being open, instead of denying the photos outright. Our intention is to accept every fish photo we possibly can. Trying to do right by you, we go back to the first-generation photo and use several photo-enhancement techniques to help us make some photos more readable. When we’re able, we also compare identifiers in ones where they are overexposed, damaged, or partially obscured or cropped off to ones in more legible photos from the same angler in the same event. If a photo provides enough evidence for the judge to authenticate an ID, we accept it. However, when KBF Tournament and Challenge judges are absolutely unable to make out the identifier marks in order to validate an ID, we DQ the photo.

KBF Identifier Legibility

The illustration for this post are pretty typical of photos we get with the partially obscured or overexposed ID forms. When, by looking at other evidence, we are to verify with 100% confidence that it’s the valid ID with the required marks, as in examples A and B, we approve the photo and proceed to judge it by the rest of the criteria. If we can’t, as in C, then we DQ the photo.

“Well, in that case,” you ask, “…why should I got to any effort to be sure my identifier, ID code and any other required marks are in the photo, not covered, and readable?” Our advice is don’t even give a judge the opportunity to DQ your photo. Don’t rely on a judge’s grace or count on him having the time, ability, tools, or temperament to put in the extra effort needed to validate a blurry or hard-to-read ID. As Paul wrote to the Romans, “What shall we say, then? Shall we go on sinning so that grace may increase? By no means!”

We appreciate each competitors’ vigilance commitment to KBF rules compliance. If you suspect an infraction or wish to report your own violation, the process described in KBF Rule #16.A. is to inform the event’s TD privately, within 24 hours, and in writing of any suspected infraction and provide evidence substantiating the charges.

What if I accidentally upload a photo twice?

Judges are on the lookout for duplicates and will simply deny a duplicate photo or a second photo of the same fish by the same competitor in the same event. TourneyX generates an email to let you know if your photo was accepted or denied.

Why do we have to lay the fish on a Hawg Trough facing left?

Bass scale patterns and identifiable markings vary from side to side. It’s possible for a judge to not recognize the same fish laid both to the right and left, so to make identification possible, all fish must be laid on a Hawg Trough facing to the left, left eye up, belly toward the bottom of the photo.

Why can't I count a fish twice in the same event if I catch it again hours, days or weeks later?

Unfortunately, it’s done because it closes the door, at least partway, on many ways of cheating. The temptation to stow a big fish in a net and feed it for a weeks or two before “catching” it again has proven irresistible to some bass fishing competitors in other tours. We want to discourage anyone from trying this. Also, if that were permitted, someone might catch a 24-inch bass in a tiny pond and then release and re-catch the same bass several more times during the competition, thereby winning with just one big fish submitted over and over. Finally, it discourages competitors from taking multiple shots of a fish—sometimes with wardrobe and staging changes for subterfuge—and then submitting those photos over a period of time.

What is meant by ||pinching the tail|| of a fish?

That’s when a competitor compresses the tips of the fish’s caudal fin (tail) in an attempt to extend its length. It does achieve a greater length, just as does measuring a bass with its mouth open. Whether or not the competitor’s hand is touching the tail in a photo, if the upper and/or lower lobe are compressed in what appears to be an unnatural way (that is, more than 50% compression of either lobe), then KBF judges will treat it as “compressed” and will apply the appropriate penalty.

What rule infractions result in a deduction in length?

The three most usual ones are mouth open, body off-center or curved, tail pinched. For the complete list, refer to the KBF Competition Rules Standards.

Why is length deducted for a fish having its mouth open?

Because the way a bass’s jaw is hinged, opening the mouth increases the length of the fish. For consistency, KBF requires that the mouth be completely closed for digital photos and deducts points (inches or fractions of an inch) depending on how wide the mouth is open. The wider it’s open, the greater the deduction. Refer to the KBF Competition Rules Standards.

What if the mouth on my bass won't close?

Then it will have points deducted for having its mouth open. It’s not as though you have any choice in the fish you catch. If you caught one that had its tail bitten off, we would measure only to the stump. In a weight tournament, a bass might have been injured and off its feed so that it comes to the scales with a caved-in belly, where a month one way or the other might add two pounds to its weight. That’s just random chance. Judges just apply the rule, regardless of the fish’s deformity.

What rule infractions result in denial or disqualification of a photo submitted for scoring?
  • An anglers submitting the same fish twice in the same competition, which has been known to happen hours, days, even weeks apart
  • A fish that is covered by the competitor’s hand, making identifying the fish or determining whether it’s alive or dead impossible.
  • A photograph that is so unfocused or in which the camera shook during the photo to produce a double-image, making accurate measurement and determination of the fish’s condition impossible.
  • A fish that is restrained by a belt, clip, or other device that secures it to the Hawg Trough
  • A photo with the fish upside down, facing the wrong direction, or on another measuring device than the Hawg Trough.
  • Specific infractions and judges responses are outlined in the KBF Competition Rules Standards
What standards do judges apply to ensure standardized, objective scoring?

The scoring criteria and penalties are outlined in the KBF Competition Rules Standards.

How does TourneyX work?

It is an Internet application that is accessible through a smartphone’s or computer’s wireless network or through hardwired networks. C-Competitors log into TourneyX on the water and find the upload button in their “dashboard.” On-screen instructions guide the Competitor through the process of supplying the fish’s length and uploading the digital photo. When received, the date (digital photos are converted to a bunch of ones and zeroes, like in The Matrix) are stored in a database. Anyone with access to the application can see some of the photos. The screens judges use allow them to change the reported length, subtract points, and either approve or deny each photo. Judges can also add comments, which the competitor receives via email.

What do I do if I'm out of cell range and cannot upload a photo to TourneyX?

In a meet-up tournament, bring you memory card or your camera/phone and a cable for uploading the data to the judges check-in station.

Can I submit the same photo in more than one Tournament or Challenge?

Yes, as long as a photo complies with all rules for each event. KBF competitors may fish as many concurrent competitive events as desired and may submit the same photo to every Challenge or Tournament for which it is eligible. If a fish is legally caught during competition hours from public-access water considered in-bounds for each of those tournaments, the same photo of that fish may be submitted in every tournament for which it qualifies.

 

Can fish caught from water spanning state borders be submitted in Challenges for either state or region?

If a fish is caught according to the regulations of a state and the competition rules, then its photo is eligible submission in that State Challenge or the Challenge of a KBF Region of which that state is a part.

For example, a TX/LA reciprocal license agreement exists for Toledo Bend Reservoir. If you hold a fishing license from either of those states and are fishing from a boat, you may legally fish anywhere on the lake as long as you hold a license from either state. If you wade fish or fish from shore, you must have the license of the state in which you’re standing.

So, if you sign up to fish in a Louisiana Challenge or a Southeast KBF Region Challenge and have either a TX or LA fishing license, you may submit photos to that event of bass legally caught anywhere on Toledo Bend. Ditto if you fish a Texas Challenge or a Big Sun KBF

If I don’t have a Smart Phone, how can I submit photos to TourneyX?

In tournaments, you will need to return early (see the KBF Competition Rules Addendum for the event you’re fishing) to turn in your media, which means removing and handing in the memory card or turning in your camera or camera/phone with a USB cable for downloading data. Judges will give you a claims slip and put your card or phone in a resealable plastic bag labeled with your name. After the data has been downloaded and the judges then upload your photos to TourneyX and verify that they display properly, then you’ll be called back to retrieve your memory card or phone/camera.

In Challenges, find a computer connected to the Internet, download your photo the that computer, open a browser, log in at tourneyx.com, and submit your photo(s) through the dashboard.

May I wade and fish in a KBF tournament?

Yes you may wade fish as long as you

  • Use your kayak to get to the fishing location
  • Remain in or by and fish only in “Eligible Water”
  • Keep your kayak in view while fishing
  • Ensure your kayak appears in the photo you submit for scoring
  • Do not trespass on private property, and do not cross or enter any area restricted to the public to get to eligible water.
Can I use “mothershipping” in a KBF-sanctioned tournament?

No, you may not. That is forbidden in the KBF Rules.

What fish species can be submitted for scoring?

Unless otherwise specified in the KBF Competition Rules Addendum for the event you’re fishing, any “black bass” is permitted. To see the complete list, refer to the KBF Competition Rules Standards.

Do fish have to comply with local length limits and slot restrictions in order to photo and submit for scoring?

Length restrictions only apply to fish that are kept. There are no rules restricting the catching and release of and particular length fish. The fact that between the catch and release you snap a photograph is not an issue, either. So no…local length restrictions are irrelevant in CPR tournaments.

Is there a minimum length for fish submitted on TourneyX?

There is, but the restriction isn’t a technical one related to TourneyX, but rather due to the fact that Hawg Troughs have no markings below 8 inches, so that is minimum measurable length of fish for kBF Tournaments. (Amazingly, nine-inch fish have turned out to be bonus winners for KBF BONUS BUCKS participants.)

In a three-fish tournament, how do I submit a fourth fish if it’s bigger than one or more of the ones I caught earlier?

On TourneyX,  select your shortest fish and eliminate it by clicking the “Cull” button. That clears room for you to add another fish in its place.

What can I do if I cull a fish, and then the one I culled for is denied or DQ’d?

Notify the Tournament Director or a judge and request that the fish you culled be re-uploaded for scoring. The Tournament Director receives an email with every fish submitted for scoring, so if he has time remaining in the tournament to submit the fish and knows your email address and the approximate time of your upload, he can find that email, save the photo, and manually upload it under your name

What is the “stop fishing” time, and how long do I have to get to a place where I can upload my photos?

The important factors are (a.) the event’s deadline to be in the judges check-in line and (b.) how long it’s going to take you to paddle back to your vehicle, load up, drive to the Tournament HQ, park, dash in, and get in line. Leave yourself some wiggle room, because KBF doesn’t deduct inches for minutes late to line; it’s all or nothing. Either you make it in line on time, or your fish for that day are DQ’d

If I disagree with a judge’s score or ruling, what should I do to challenge it?

First, you cannot dispute a judges ruling regarding another angler’s score or penalties, only your own. If you feel like a mistake has been made or a judges ruling was unjustified and you would like it reviewed, your first step is to go directly to the Tournament Director and inform him of the issue. Do NOT air your grievance with other anglers and attempt to gain support from a group; that’s going to backfire on you. Tournament Directors, more than anyone, are committed to impartiality, objective and fair judging, and consistency in applying the standards, and they are responsible for determining the course of action when a situation arises that is not specifically addressed in the rules.

Are electric motors allowed in KBF-sanctioned tournaments?

Yes, they are.

How does qualifying twice for the National Championship benefit me?

In 2015, while qualifying for the 2016 National Championship, if one qualified twice and at least one of the qualifying events was a KBF online Challenge, then the twice-qualified had his Entry Fee paid by Kayak Bass Fishing. Otherwise, there’s no advantage to any angler who qualifies twice. That’s not to say no one benefits. If a club’s AOY, for instance, has already qualified for the next year’s KBF National Championship, then that club’s Tournament Director determines who is next in line and the qualified slot “rolls” down to that next person.

If I fish on a reciprocal license border lake, can I submit fish caught anywhere on that lake?

If border states have reciprocal license agreements (licenses from one state are valid in the bordering state’s water), then yes; you may submit fish to events in either state that you catch in the reciprocal license area of that lake. However, if there is no reciprocity, then you may submit fish to the Challenge caught in the water of that state or region.

Why must I report in early if I can't upload them from my smart phone?

The point of using TourneyX is for speed, accuracy, and consistency. All digital photos must be entered into TourneyX prior to scoring. If you cannot do that on the lake or on your way back to Tournament HQ, then the judges will need to do that for you. It takes time to collect and label the camera or smart phone, download the images, and then manually upload them to TourneyX using the judges dashboard. Rather than make all the other competitors wait on the few who cannot or choose not to upload to TourneyX, we require those competitors to report in an hour early.

What does KBF do when an identifier in a photo is damaged, partially covered, or the lighting makes it hard to read?

Rule 10.A. states, in part: “A. Legible. Photo must be positioned in the photo and clear enough to read identifier, including required ID codes and marks….”Whether bass photos in KBF Challenges should be accepted or disqualified based on the readability or legibility of an identifier is an important question. We see photos in almost every event where we have to exert extra effort to validate an ID that is not completely legible. We want all our members to fully understand our rules and rationales.We enter into a contract with each angler who registers to compete in KBF competition. KBF agrees to conduct a fair, impartial, professional event and make judgement calls in accordance with the rules, without bias or favoritism. The competitor agrees to comply with the rules and abide by the terms and conditions of competition.To that end, the judges in KBF events bend over backwards to evaluate each fish submitted to us on its merits, within the rules, and disqualify photos only as a last resort. When possible, we impose progressive penalties for some infractions, like a bass’s mouth being open, instead of denying the photos outright. Our intention is to accept every fish photo we possibly can. Trying to do right by you, we go back to the first-generation photo and use several photo-enhancement techniques to help us make some photos more readable. When we’re able, we also compare identifiers in ones where they are overexposed, damaged, or partially obscured or cropped off to ones in more legible photos from the same angler in the same event. If a photo provides enough evidence for the judge to authenticate an ID, we accept it. However, when KBF Tournament and Challenge judges are absolutely unable to make out the identifier marks in order to validate an ID, we DQ the photo.

KBF Identifier LegibilityThe illustration for this post are pretty typical of photos we get with the partially obscured or overexposed ID forms. When, by looking at other evidence, we are to verify with 100% confidence that it’s the valid ID with the required marks, as in examples A and B, we approve the photo and proceed to judge it by the rest of the criteria. If we can’t, as in C, then we DQ the photo.“Well, in that case,” you ask, “…why should I got to any effort to be sure my identifier, ID code and any other required marks are in the photo, not covered, and readable?” Our advice is don’t even give a judge the opportunity to DQ your photo. Don’t rely on a judge’s grace or count on him having the time, ability, tools, or temperament to put in the extra effort needed to validate a blurry or hard-to-read ID. As Paul wrote to the Romans, “What shall we say, then? Shall we go on sinning so that grace may increase? By no means!”We appreciate each competitors’ vigilance commitment to KBF rules compliance. If you suspect an infraction or wish to report your own violation, the process described in KBF Rule #16.A. is to inform the event’s TD privately, within 24 hours, and in writing of any suspected infraction and provide evidence substantiating the charges.